Archive for Chocolate

The Pink Squirrel ala The Cocktail Vultures

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Girl Drink Drunk, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 8, 2013 by cocktailvultures

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The Pink Squirrel a la Cocktail Vultures

The story goes that the Pink Squirrel was invented in 1941 in a bar in Wisconsin, but didn’t enter the popular imagination until the Sixties when it became identified as one of the original “girl drinks.”  Those suburban housewives were looking for something stronger than a lemonade in the afternoon while playing bridge or Mah Jong.  The Pink Squirrel was thereby brought to ruin through the marketing of bottled versions in liquor stores, and powdered prefab make-it-yourself kits in supermarkets. The Cocktail Vultures love a challenge, and decided to rediscover what made this drink popular so many years ago. We kicked the recipe around the block a bit, took out the Creme de Cacao, and put back what we’ve discovered was an ingredient in the original recipe: ice cream.

To a shaker, add:

2 ounces Creme de Noyaux
1 ounce chocolate vodka (Our favorite: http://www.vodka360.com/brandsflavors/360-double-chocolate.html)
2 ounces melted vanilla ice cream

Shake long and hard with crushed ice; strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

A note on Creme de Noyaux: it’s an almond-flavored, sweet liqueur. It’s old-timey and not easy to find. Brands include Hiram Walker, Bols and Marie Brizard. If you only manage to snag a bottle of Creme de Almond, add a drop of red food coloring to stay with the original pink color.

Created 7/31/2010

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The Grasshopper ala Cocktail Vultures

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Girl Drink Drunk, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2013 by cocktailvultures

grasshopper

The Grasshopper a la Cocktail Vultures

A sweet, creamy, minty cocktail that became popular alongside her pink sister, the Pink Squirrel, with the same crowd and for the same reasons. When tweaking the original recipe, the Cocktail Vultures turned once again to ice cream. And we threw out the Creme de Cacao and brought in a quality chocolate vodka. The chocolate flavor in most Creme de Cacao is phony and barely there anyway, and all it lends is a heavy stickiness. The ice cream provides sweetness, and the vodka gives a better jolt of chocolate as well as a pleasant kick that makes this more than a girl-drink.

To an iced shaker, add:

2 ounces Creme de Menthe
2 ounces chocolate vodka http://www.vodka360.com/brandsflavors/360-double-chocolate.html
3 ounces melted vanilla ice cream

Shake vigorously and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Created 9/2/2010

The “Drawing Room” Cocktail or how to catch more barflies with vinegar

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 19, 2011 by cocktailvultures

Preprandial cocktails can run the gamut, from astringent Martinis to elaborate tropical drinks that make you forget all about dinner and reach for the nearest puu puu platter. But what about a palate-cleansing cocktail served immediately after a large meal, or even between courses? The Cocktail Vultures have concocted just such a number, utilizing one of our homemade syrups, and leaving our little buddy Lime out of the picture for a change. Fear not! You can definitely do this one yourself. And in keeping with the Victorian custom of ladies and gentlemen withdrawing after dinner, we have named it:

The Drawing Room

To a shaker filled with ice, add:

1 ounce rye whiskey
1/2 ounce black currant cordial
1/3 ounce balsamic vinegar syrup (instructions to follow)
3 dashes whiskey barrel aged bitters
2 dashes chocolate bitters

Shake vigorously and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

We think this would be wonderful after a course of strong cheese or roasted meat.PN

Recipe and How-To for the “Balsamic Vinegar Syrup”

4 ounces aged Balsamic Vinegar (4 year aged or better)

4 ounces pure cane sugar

Combine both ingredients in a non-reactive saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally until sugar is dissolved. This is one of the few syrups where a little reduction is fine and makes for a smoother flavor.

Cool to room temperature and bottle. Keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks but best used after a 12-24 hour rest period after bottling.

JN