Archive for rye

Widow Jane’s “Older Fashioned”

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, Uncategorized, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 18, 2013 by cocktailvultures

older fashioned insta copy 2Widow Jane’s Older Fashioned

Today’s drinkers and distillers are changing their minds about rye, that very American booze formerly favored by older gentlemen with barroom tans and smelly sweaters. We recently sampled a great new rye with local provenance; Widow Jane Rye (http://widowjane.com/products/) is made with pure water from a limestone mine in nearby Rosendale, NY and distilled and aged in Brooklyn. An “Older Fashioned” seemed the best way to enjoy its smooth, dry flavor.  We call it an “Older” Fashioned due to the rich and robust flavor derived from the Cranberry and Plum compote which gives an elegant depth to the drink, as opposed to the candy counter sweetness of the standard maraschino cherries. This would be a great cocktail to hand around before or after the Big Holiday Dinner.  Cranberries aren’t just for turkey!

In a rocks glass:

Muddle an orange slice with a dash or two of Bitters (we used Whiskey Barrel Aged Bitters)  and a heaping  teaspoon of Cranberry Plum Compote (instructions to follow).

Add 3 ounces Widow Jane Rye. Stir, stir, stir.

Add your desired number of ice cubes. Stir, stir, stir.

Top up with an ounce or so of club soda. Stir, stir, stir.

Test for temperature — it should be very cold — and add a swizzle stick. Another pristine piece of orange peel may be used as garnish.

 

Cranberry Plum Compote

To a saucepan, add:

2 cups fresh cranberries
1/4 cup dried plums or other dried fruit
3/4 to 1 cup light brown sugar
Water to cover berries

Keep stirring over medium heat until the cranberries start popping their skins. Remove from heat and let stand to cool. Store in refrigerator up to 3-5 days.

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A Drink With Something In It

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, The Vulture's Library with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 2, 2013 by cocktailvultures

A DRINK WITH SOMETHING IN IT
by Ogden Nash

There is something about a Martini,
A tingle remarkably pleasant;
A yellow, a mellow Martini;
I wish that I had one at present.
There is something about a Martini,
Ere the dining and dancing begin,
And to tell you the truth,
It is not the vermouth-
I think that perhaps it’s the gin.

There is something about an old-fashioned
That kindles a cardiac glow;
It is soothing and soft and impassioned
As a lyric by Swinburne or Poe.
There is something about an old-fashioned
When dusk has enveloped the sky,
And it may the ice,
Or the pineapple slice,
But I strong suspect it’s the rye.

There is something about a mint julep.
It is nectar imbibed in a dream,
As fresh as the bud of the tulip,
As cool as the bed of the stream.
There is something about a mint julep,
A fragrance beloved by the lucky.
And perhaps it’s the tint
Of the frost and the mint,
But I think it was born in Kentucky.

There is something they put in a highball
That awakens the torpidest brain,
That kindles a spark in the eyeball,
Gliding singing through vein after vein.
There is something they put in a highball
Which you’ll notice one day, if you watch;
And it may be the soda,
But judged by the odor,
I rather believe it’s the Scotch

Then here’s to the heartening wassail,
Wherever good fellows are found;
Be its master instead of its vassal,
And order the glasses around.
For there’s something they put in the wassail
That prevents it from tasting like wicker;
Since it’s not tapioca,
Or mustard, or mocha,
I’m forced to conclude it’s the liquor.

How Rye I Am

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 25, 2013 by cocktailvultures

Templeton Rye

This weekend we explored a couple of very old-timey recipes that make use of rye whiskey. The Algonquin was invented at the bar in the venerable NYC hotel of the same name; a jot of pineapple juice is among the ingredients and it smooths and sweetens the drink Just Enough without taking over the well-balanced flavor profile. We also took The Oriental out for a spin; it uses sweet vermouth and fresh lime in perfect proportions to showcase the beauty of a good rye.

So what’s a good rye? We love Templeton, a smooth, complex whiskey without any of that stinky-old-man thing you get from some ryes. This IS the good stuff!

Always drink responsibly; always drink well.

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The “Drawing Room” Cocktail or how to catch more barflies with vinegar

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 19, 2011 by cocktailvultures

Preprandial cocktails can run the gamut, from astringent Martinis to elaborate tropical drinks that make you forget all about dinner and reach for the nearest puu puu platter. But what about a palate-cleansing cocktail served immediately after a large meal, or even between courses? The Cocktail Vultures have concocted just such a number, utilizing one of our homemade syrups, and leaving our little buddy Lime out of the picture for a change. Fear not! You can definitely do this one yourself. And in keeping with the Victorian custom of ladies and gentlemen withdrawing after dinner, we have named it:

The Drawing Room

To a shaker filled with ice, add:

1 ounce rye whiskey
1/2 ounce black currant cordial
1/3 ounce balsamic vinegar syrup (instructions to follow)
3 dashes whiskey barrel aged bitters
2 dashes chocolate bitters

Shake vigorously and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

We think this would be wonderful after a course of strong cheese or roasted meat.PN

Recipe and How-To for the “Balsamic Vinegar Syrup”

4 ounces aged Balsamic Vinegar (4 year aged or better)

4 ounces pure cane sugar

Combine both ingredients in a non-reactive saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally until sugar is dissolved. This is one of the few syrups where a little reduction is fine and makes for a smoother flavor.

Cool to room temperature and bottle. Keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks but best used after a 12-24 hour rest period after bottling.

JN

What I’m Mixing 11/12/11

Posted in Booze News and Events, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , on November 14, 2011 by cocktailvultures

Found this interesting recipe on Serious Eats and gave it a whirl Friday night. It was strong and beautifully balanced, with a wonderful silkiness from the egg. Try it yourself before all the pumpkin ale is gone!PN

The Great Pumpkin

Posted by The Serious Eats Team, October 27, 2011 at 11:46 AM

This creamy, pumpkiny cocktail from Jim Meehan of PDT captures rich fall flavors. Be sure to shake for a long time for a good foam, and don’t skip the freshly grated nutmeg.

Meehan calls for Southampton pumpkin ale.

Special equipment: cocktail shaker and strainer

Ingredients
serves 1, active time 5 minutes, total time 5 minutes

2 ounces pumpkin ale
1 ounce RIttenhouse Bonded rye
1 ounce Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy
.5 ounce Grade B Maple Syrup
1 whole egg
Ice
Whole nutmeg for garnish
Procedures
Add pumpkin ale, rye, apple brandy, and maple syrup to a mixing glass. Swirl to decarbonate beer. Add egg and shake without ice until foamy. Add ice, shake well, then strain into chilled serving glass. Garnish with grated nutmeg.