Archive for vintage

The Sheik

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 1, 2013 by cocktailvultures

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The Sheik

“At night when you’re asleep,
Into your tent I’ll creep…”

Well, we hope you’ll be carrying a tray of these serious cocktails. Something with brandy, fresh citrus, and the sweet darkness of vermouth and cherry. Where’s the fainting couch?

To an iced shaker, add:

1 ounce Napoleon brandy
1 ounce freshly-squeezed orange juice
3/4 ounce sweet vermouth
3/4 ounce Cherry Heering

Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

For garnish: score an orange rind to create a crosshatching pattern, then peel a large swath and roll it around a pick to create the “turban.” (See picture below) Dropping in a brandied cherry would not be looked upon as amiss.

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An homage to the classic “Blood and Sand Cocktail” and inspired by clothing designer Matthew Camp and his love of this drink, with a nod to Rudy Valentino.

The Carnosaur, the bloodiest Bloody Mary

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 26, 2013 by cocktailvultures

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Carnosaur
If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you know we’re big fans of the classic Bloody Mary (see https://cocktailvultures.wordpress.com/2011/10/21/building-a-better-bloody-mary/). But we’re Vultures, and we’re always on the lookout for more.

Anywhere there’s brunch, there’s a Bloody Mary. And brunch starts to proliferate as Spring approaches and grills come out. The smoky scent of grilling meat, the clink of glasses… A Bloody Mary — with meat.

First, take a nice piece of London Broil, your favorite cut, and rub it down with some steak seasoning. (We used a Montreal steak spice). Grill for 5 minutes on each side, then place the meat between two plastic cutting boards and press the juices out into a convenient container.

To an iced shaker, add:

2 ounces vodka
4 ounces tomato or vegetable juice
1 ounce meat juice extrusion
1/2 ounce freshly-squeezed lemon juice
1/2 ounce Demitri’s Spices (www.demitris.com)

Shake vigorously. Strain into an ice-filled highball glass. Add a skewered, thin slice of the prepared London Broil, as well as a straw and some of your favorite Bloody Mary garnishes. Ours include celery, olives and lemon wedges. Go nuts! This drink is a fragrant, fun celebration.

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carno blood

Maraschino: a secret dusty old time ingredient

Posted in Classic Cocktails, Tools of the Trade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on January 7, 2013 by cocktailvultures

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Maraschino lends, in simple terms, an Olde Time flavor to vintage and modern cocktails.

Once you’ve tasted it in a recipe, you’ll always recognize its strangely compelling flavor. A little goes a looooong way.

We can only recommend Luxardo as a brand because of the proprietary nature of the formula — it’s the real deal.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maraschino

Prohibition Repeal Day! December 5th

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, Girl Drink Drunk, Meet the Vulture Squadron, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 5, 2012 by cocktailvultures

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If ever there was a day for Cocktailians, Imbibers, Drunks and Casual Tipplers to celebrate, it’s today, which marks the 79th anniversary of the repeal of the 18th amendment, Prohibition, or as we like to call it, Alcoholic Independence Day.

So go out or stay in and raise a glass to common sense and good taste and to the fine work of forgotten bootleggers of yore who kept us at least in bathtub gin and smuggled rum, and to Al Capone who made his legend keeping the hooch flowing.

Salted Caramel Martini ala The Cocktail Vultures

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 7, 2012 by cocktailvultures

Salted Caramel Martini
a la The Cocktail Vultures

There are a lot of recipes out there for Salted Caramel cocktails, as even foodies and TV chefs try to follow this culinary trend into the realm of adult beverages.

As our readers can easily discern, the Cocktail Vultures have no problem with over-complicating a thing when the results are delicious and the process is fun.

But in the case of our Salted Caramel Martini, we definitely feel that Less is More. A sprinkle of this, a hint of that, and a good product becomes a great cocktail.

To a shaker filled with ice, add:

1.5 ounces caramel vodka
(We recommend Van Gogh Dutch Caramel Vodka)
.5 ounce vanilla vodka

Shake vigorously. Run a fresh piece of lemon peel around the rim of a chilled cocktail glass, then sprinkle the glass lightly with some Kosher salt (fine or coarse).

Strain the cocktail into the glass, and float that peel on top.

Enjoy before dinner or after, with dessert or without.

Always drink responsibly; always drink well.

The “CALL OF CTHULHU” Cocktail

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails, Drink It Like a Man, Meet the Vulture Squadron, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 19, 2012 by cocktailvultures

Call of Cthulhu: A Cocktail

By Peggy Nadramia and Joe Netherworld

Since the beginning of our association in the Cocktail Lab, we have discussed our mutual desire to create a libation evoking the essence of the slumbering horror that is Cthulhu, the cosmic Old One first brought to the consciousness of man by New England author, Howard Phillips Lovecraft. But it couldn’t happen until the stars were right, and we had received the Elder Sign. The time has come.

The Cocktail Vultures have been pleasing your palate for awhile now, but all is not fun and games here at the Lab. Last night we were possessed with an irresistible frenzy to mix, to mix well, and to taste a drink both powerful and beguiling. We have found it.

The short story “Call of Cthulhu” first appeared in 1928, in an issue of Weird Tales, the pulp magazine familiar to every reader of horror fiction. This was a time when Westerners were just beginning to be exposed to the exoticism and sensuality of life in the tropical seas, and also to the barbarity of the pagan cultures found there. We based the drink on the tropical grogs of those climes, with plenty of fresh citrus and three kinds of decadent rum. Its structure is also a nod to Don the Beachcomber’s original Zombie, a name that conjures visions of helpless humans trapped in a spell of forgetfulness and servitude. The maraschino liqueur adds a whiff of dusty forbidden tomes. To facilitate disturbing dreams, we included Strega, the ultimate Witch liqueur from a site in Italy originally known as Malevento – the place of evil events. The blue Curacao is essential; do not even consider replacing it or the gods may be disturbed and awakened prematurely; when you look at the finished result of our mixology, you’ll understand why you must adhere to the recipe. Finally, we had to add the Madness From the Sea, and so a sprinkling of brine is called for in the presentation of the drink.

Be careful; we recommend one cocktail per guest. One doesn’t summon Cthulhu lightly, and one treats him with respect, or pays the price. Heed this warning, and always drink, and call to the Elder Gods, responsibly.

To a blender, add:

1 ounce Kraken rum (some scholars believe H. P. Lovecraft was inspired by Tennyson’s poem of the same name)

1 ounce gold rum (we used Appleton Special Jamaican Rum)

1 ounce Lemon Hart 151 Demerara Rum

¼ ounce falernum

½ ounce Maraschino liqueur

½ ounce blue Curacao

¾ ounce lime juice

¾ ounce grapefruit juice

¾ ounce orange juice (all our citrus is freshly-squeezed)

¾ ounce pineapple juice

2 dashes aromatic bitters (we used Bitter Truth)

1/8 teaspoon Strega liqueur

1 cup crushed ice

Blend for 5 seconds. Pour unstrained into a mug or chimney glass, to which you have added more crushed ice. Sprinkle the surface of the cocktail with approximately ½ teaspoon of brine (recipe to follow).

Brine: in a small mixing glass, combine 2 ounces of vodka with ¼ teaspoon of sea salt, stirring until salt is dissolved. May be transferred to a dasher bottle or eyedropper.

Garnish with a slice of star fruit and tentacles carved from lime shell.

Ignore that faint chanting you think you hear; we’re sure those are not the strains of pagan music beginning to grow louder. Sip, as your mind begins to be swayed by the great god Cthulhu, who is rumored to whisper in his sleep…

P.S. (from Joe Netherworld): I can hold my booze alongside the great drunks of our age, but I have to say this potion is a challenge to my imbibing abilities! It will lay you low and leave you babbling incoherently in the darkness

Gin Julep

Posted in Classic Cocktails, What I'm Mixing with tags , , , , on June 3, 2012 by cocktailvultures

The original julep, some believe. A whole different experience, refreshing but slightly astringent. A different gin will no doubt render a somewhat different result; we used Warwick American Dry Rustic Gin from the beautiful Hudson Valley.

In a cocktail shaker, muddle around two dozen mint leaves with a quarter cup of crushed ice.

Add:

3 ounces gin
1.5 ounces simple syrup
Another cup of crushed ice.

Shake vigorously. Strain into two julep cups (or two frozen Manhattan glasses) filled with crushed ice. Add a generous swath of fresh mint and a straw.

Happy afternoons on the porch…

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Peach Brandy: Back From the Dead

Posted in Booze News and Events, Classic Cocktails with tags , , , on April 2, 2012 by cocktailvultures

Before Prohibition, American peach brandy was a commonly-used cocktail ingredient and a lovely thing to sip on its own. It was real brandy, a distilled spirit, the peach equivalent of applejack or Calvados. And Americans made the best. Prohibition ended production — until now.

Dutch’s Spirits, in beautiful upstate New York, has brought back real peach brandy, aged in wood. Its hefty medicine bottle speaks to the gentle strength of its contents. This stuff is smooth fire, with a whiff of fruit. Don’t put it in a Fuzzy Navel, but do try it on its own or in any cocktail that uses brandy or cognac.

Thanks to Dutch’s for restoring another delicious ingredient we thought lost to time.

Dutch’s Peach Brandy

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